Decorative inlays inlay kits

Tips and Tricks to Build Flawless Inlays

Close up picture of a plunge router, made by Milwaukee, being supported by multiple templates

On this page we'll share with you many of the tips and tricks we've learned over the years while building inlays.  Some of these tips may sound pretty lame, like clean up dust before you use double sided tape, but let me tell you, when something goes wrong because of a little thing...  >:(

 

So scroll down and see if you can avoid some of the gotcha's that's got us in the past.  We already made the mistakes so you don't have to!

My Router Tips Over

Many of the router templates EZInlays manufactures are only 4" wide.  That means the router base isn't fully supported all the time while making cuts.  In the post we'll discuss the various options you have for supporting the router during the cutting process.

Without a good base the router can tip over during the cutting process.

Plunge Router and Support Base

My Inlays Don't Fit in the Void

There are a couple of factors that can lead to this problem.  First and foremost is a dull router bit.  Like rule 1 of woodworking states: Sharp Tools Cut Best!!!


   The other thing to check is if the router bit is centered in the busing.  The picture below depicts an offset router bit which can lead to ill fitting inlay pieces.  This post discusses how to center the router bit in the bearing to get more accurate cuts.

Close up picture of a router bit that isn't centered in the center of the bushing

Non Centered Router Bit

Template Alignment

The beauty of an EZInlays inlay kit is you don't need to measure, you just need to create and reference alignment marks.

 

We utilize two different alignment marking techniques: circles and lines which are discussed in detail on this page.

Picture of straight lines being used as aligment marks for making a coaster.

Circles used for Alignment

Using Lines for Alignment

Sanding Tools

The type of sanding tool you will want to use depends on the type of inlay being built.  One sander I always use is a random orbital (RO) sander. I have two of them but I prefer the Porter Cable sander.  I've gone through about 5 sanding pads now so you know it gets used the most.

 

I like to use my Dremel for sanding inlays with small curves in them
like the stem from RoseBud.

Close up picture of a hand held RO sander made by Porter Cable
Hand held rotary tooll, made by Dremel, with a large sanding drum attached.
Picture of all the cut out inlay peices created from the EZInlays RoseBud Decorative Inlay Kit.

RO Sander

Dremel

RoseBud stem

Close up picture of a plunge router, made by Milwaukee, being supported by multiple templates
Without a good base the router can tip over during the cutting process.
Close up picture of a router bit that isn't centered in the center of the bushing
Picture of straight lines being used as aligment marks for making a coaster.
Close up picture of a hand held RO sander made by Porter Cable
Hand held rotary tooll, made by Dremel, with a large sanding drum attached.
Picture of all the cut out inlay peices created from the EZInlays RoseBud Decorative Inlay Kit.